A photographer/collector who likes analog cameras and the images film produces, while also enjoying

A photographer/collector who likes analog cameras and the images film produces, while also enjoying
A photographer/collector who likes analog cameras and the images film produces, while also enjoying the latest digital.

Monday, September 22, 2014

A Remington Standard No. 7



About a month ago I acquired this typewriter because it looked different.  Saw it on Craig’s List, purchased it, brought it home and put it on the shelf without even looking at it as a lot was going on at the time.

Pulled it down off the shelf this morning for the first time since and snapped some images of it (Sorry about the quality of the images, used by iPhone & it does not produce the widest dynamic range…..)  For your consideration is a Remington Standard No. 7.  This is my first dealing with this old a Remington.

The http://typewriterdatabase.com/ lists this particular machine (#192249) as manufactured in 1898.

Have not fully checked for functionality although I can say that the  platen does  not move when the space bar is depressed.   Also, simple to see that the rollers and platen are in very poor shape.  I also assume there should be a paper rest behind the platen.  May decide that without the paper rest it would look to awkward and will start a refurbish?

Before I do anything, I want to obtain an operators manual, hopefully even a copy of a service manual, and a few images of one in serviceable shape for comparison.  Not sure I even know how everything is supposed to work on this machine.

The platen flips?  There are two images below that show the platen in the two positions.  Plus, there are some pulleys on the carrier that have nothing running through them, which I suppose is a problem.

Hope you enjoy the images.  Now to submit some questions on the Typewriter forum.  More to come……….









 



































































 
Definitions:
Remington Standard No. 7:
Remington began production of this model in 1896 and ran through 1914.  Apparently manufactured mainly for the British market.

3 comments :

  1. If the pulleys you mentioned are the large ones on the sides, those are the ribbon spools. On older upstroke machines, and many backstroke ones, the ribbon was of a rather large width compared to what the standard ended up becoming.

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  2. On the very first image you see the platen. Behind the platen are two vertical metal bars. Behind those two bars (And just to the outside of each) you see the top of these two pulleys. I don't know if one string should run between the two pulleys and then down into the machine or if each side runs into the typewriter separately?

    I am unable to tell on the images of other Model 7's because those images a too straight on and do not show that area........

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  3. I just figured out the rollers. They are what the carriage rides on the rail with..........

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